Caoimhe O'Mahony
Applied Psychology / Year 4

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Caoimhe  O'Mahony

Caoimhe O'Mahony

Applied Psychology

Year 4

  • Project Title Part-Time Employment, Academic Performance, and Social Life, as Predictors of Student Life Satisfaction
  • Course BSc [Hons] Applied Psychology
  • Year 4
  • Contact Info caoimheomahony27@gmail.com

Predictors of Student Life Satisfaction

The aims of this exploratory study included the investigation of the relationship between student part-time employment, academic performance, and social life, and their influence on life satisfaction.

Project Description

Background: One in every 22 people in Ireland is a higher education student. Within student life, individuals are expected to maintain a balance among various college requirements. Maintaining this balance can be stressful, and may negatively influence a student’s overall life satisfaction. Previous research has suggested various academic, social, and employment factors may significantly influence life satisfaction. However, research in this area from an Irish perspective has not been conducted in almost a decade. Method: 142 third-level students were recruited through online convenience sampling, and were required to complete a 27-item questionnaire in relation to part-time employment, academic performance, social life, and overall life satisfaction. Statistical analysis was conducted by means of an independent t-test, two multiple regressions, and sub-group analysis. Results: Findings indicated a non-significant difference in life satisfaction between employed and unemployed students. However, both stress and confidence in relation to academic self-efficacy was found to influence life satisfaction among the student sample. Life satisfaction was also not significantly influenced by students' number of working hours per week. Conclusion: Although there were no significant differences in life satisfaction based on employment status, students’ perception of confidence and stress in relation to academic self-efficacy is an important factor in the prediction of high life satisfaction. Future research should examine additional social, cognitive, and environmental factors which may significantly influence student life satisfaction.

Project Findings

Results: Findings indicated a non-significant difference in life satisfaction between employed and unemployed students. However, both stress and confidence in relation to academic self-efficacy was found to influence life satisfaction among the student sample. Life satisfaction was also not significantly influenced by students' number of working hours per week.

Caoimhe O'Mahony
Applied Psychology / Year 4