Lorraine Coleman
Applied Psychology / Year 4

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Lorraine Coleman

Lorraine Coleman

Applied Psychology

Year 4

  • Project Title The Effect of Age, Personality Type and Sport Participation on Female Resilience
  • Course BSc [Hons] Applied Psychology
  • Year 4
  • Contact Info lorraine93@gmail.com

Female Resilience

The aim of this research study was to investigate the impact of age, personality type and participation in sport on female resilience.

Project Description

Resilience describes the ability to adapt positively, or maintain / regain mental health, despite experiencing adversity. Research has suggested that resilience may be a central virtue for all individuals, including students, athletes and employees. However, previous research has also suggested that in stressful situations women may be less resilient than men. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify some of the factors which may affect the resilience of females. Data was collected from 117 females aged between 16 and 60 years. A short demographic questionnaire was used to determine age and sport participation status. A modified version of the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI) assessed participants’ personality types. Participants’ resilience scores were calculated using the 10-Item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-10). A three-way analysis of variance was carried out to determine if age (16-30 years; 31-45 years; 46-60 years), personality type (extraversion; agreeableness; conscientiousness; openness to experience) or sport participation (team sport; individual sport; no sport participation) has an effect on female resilience.

Project Findings

Results of this study suggested a significant difference in resilience exists for individuals aged between 16 and 30 years, and 31 to 45 years, with those in the older age category demonstrating higher resilience compared to the females in the younger age category. A similar significant difference in resilience appeared to exist for individuals aged between 16 and 30 years and from 46 to 60 years. These results suggested that younger adults (<31 years) may be less resilient than older adults (>30 years), supporting previous research. No significant result was recorded for the effect of personality type or sport participation on female resilience. Findings from the present study suggest that resilience building strategies may be important for younger females, under the age of 31 years, as they appear to have lower resilience than females over that age.

Lorraine Coleman
Applied Psychology / Year 4