Diarmuid Drumgoole
Applied Psychology / Year 4

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Diarmuid Drumgoole

Diarmuid Drumgoole

Applied Psychology

Year 4

  • Project Title Examining the effectiveness of exercise as a perceived stress reduction mechanism as workload increases
  • Course BSc [Hons] Applied Psychology
  • Year 4
  • Contact Info diarmuiddrumgoole@hotmail.com

The affects of balancing exercise with a high workload

The current study aimed to investigate whether or not sport and exercise continue to reduce perceived stress levels as workload from both college and employment outside of college increases

Project Description

Objective: The current study aimed to investigate whether or not sport and exercise continue to reduce perceived stress levels as workload from both college and employment increases. Method: Sixty students from the Institute of Art and Design Technology (IADT) Dun Laoghaire took part in the study. Participants were asked to complete the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale, The Modifiable Activity Questionnaire, as well as questions regarding general demographics, hours spent on college and employed work, and a qualitative question which asked the reasons why participants choose to continue exercising. Results: The study found no significant relationship between workload and exercise on students’ perceived stress scores, however a relationship was evident where exercise level was positively associated with a lower stress score. There was a significant interaction between workload and perceived stress where it was found that a low workload was associated with a higher level of perceived stress. Discussion: The study brings attention to the effects that a high college workload may have on a student’s level of stress. The findings suggest that college has more of an impact on the stress of students than paid employment and that students who engage in little work and exercise in fact report the highest level of stress of all participants.

Project Findings

The study found no significant relationship between workload and exercise on students’ perceived stress scores, however a relationship was evident where exercise level was positively associated with a lower stress score. There was a significant interaction between workload and perceived stress where it was found that a low workload was associated with a higher level of perceived stress

Diarmuid Drumgoole
Applied Psychology / Year 4